In Issue 46

ROLL UP! ROLL UP! We’ve gone so darn colourful with this issue, you may need to grab your shades...

Whether you remember the 80s with fond nostalgia or have a new found appreciation for the period – boy, oh boy you’re in for a treat. We kick off with a throwback to our 80s-themed issue from four years ago, and we give you lucky readers a heads up on how to get hold of your very own copy. It’s the perfect introduction to Matt Fox’s collection of mindboggling 80s gadgets and memorabilia that comes next.

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Woo Gilchrist
Roll Up, Roll Up...

It’s certainly not hard to see the appeal of fairground antiques and here we show items either currently for sale, recently sold or, in some cases “not for sale” and never will be as they are treasured in their owner’s private collection. These are objects that either appeal to our fond childhood memories or fill us with a strange curiosity, either way they are of real historical and artistic interest.

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Woo Gilchrist
Vera Pegrum - The UK’s answer to Tretchikoff?

Over the Years, a number of people have drawn comparisons between the paintings produced
by Vera Pegrum and Vladimir Tretchikoff. The similarities cited, however, tend to be superficial, revolving mainly around their subject matter and style – both painted portraits of Asian and African men and women, and both tended toward realism as their medium.

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Woo Gilchrist
Ecclesiastical Proportions

There are a whole congregation of converts out there ready to make the leap of faith and either buy an already converted church, or carry out their own conversion. We can thank the Victorians for building far too many of them – as even in their time, they were usually only half-full!

Built in 1881, this impressive Grade II listed church is set within its own surrounding gardens in Faversham, Kent. It was funded by a local gunpowder manufacturer’s widow to serve the town’s local parishioners.

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Woo Gilchrist
Holding their Own

Made from fibre cement Willy Guhl’s planters are so darn stylish that they wouldn’t look at all out of place inside your home.

Willy Guhl (1915-2004) was a pioneering Swiss furniture designer and one of the first industrial designers in Switzerland. He made his mark through unconventional experimentation with new materials, concise and timeless designs, and an immense technical understanding.

Guhl initially trained as a carpenter before going on to study at the Zurich School of Applied Arts, and in 1939 opened his own cabinetmaking workshop. He later went back to teach at the school for 39 years - with many of his former students becoming leading designers in their own right, including Robert Haussmann, Kurt Thut and Bruno Rey.

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Woo Gilchrist
Issue 44 - What's in this issue?

I don’t know about you, but if feels like it’s been a hell of a slow start to 2019. Perhaps we weren’t feeling that optimistic about the coming year, in particular the next few months, and all the uncertainty that comes with living in the UK at the moment.

I know we’re concerned about how decisions will impact on our businesses as publishers and dealers, as the European marketplace has been very important to us over the years. We have established some great connections, and as you know, we do love to travel! There are a number of shows we’ll be attending over the next few months, from Brussels to Amsterdam, and hope it will all continue to be as effortless (and as much fun) as it’s been in previous years.

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Woo Gilchrist