Issue 45 - What's in this issue?

I can hardly believe it’s a year ago this issue, that Kieran Mathewson joined the VE Collective, and with him brought the antiques trade that little bit closer...

He’s asked some very searching questions, and dug deep into the lives of each dealer featured, to find out what they do, and why they do it? Trading Places has become an incredibly popular aspect of the magazine, and there are so many more entrepreneurs out there with a story to tell us. Kieran has certainly worked his antique- loving butt off for nothing more than his love for VE – and by now you’ll have figure out, that just about everyone involved in the trade does it because of the love, not the money!

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Woo Gilchrist
Ecclesiastical Proportions

There are a whole congregation of converts out there ready to make the leap of faith and either buy an already converted church, or carry out their own conversion. We can thank the Victorians for building far too many of them – as even in their time, they were usually only half-full!

Built in 1881, this impressive Grade II listed church is set within its own surrounding gardens in Faversham, Kent. It was funded by a local gunpowder manufacturer’s widow to serve the town’s local parishioners. Its foundations are constructed of a traditional knapped flint and Bath stone dressing, topped with a signature Kent peg tile roof featuring cross-shaped saddlestones. The private driveway leads to an arched doorway entrance, with original colonnettes, behind which the impressive internal living space unfolds.

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Woo Gilchrist
Holding their Own

Made from fibre cement Willy Guhl’s planters are so darn stylish that they wouldn’t look at all out of place inside your home.

Willy Guhl (1915-2004) was a pioneering Swiss furniture designer and one of the first industrial designers in Switzerland. He made his mark through unconventional experimentation with new materials, concise and timeless designs, and an immense technical understanding.

Guhl initially trained as a carpenter before going on to study at the Zurich School of Applied Arts, and in 1939 opened his own cabinetmaking workshop. He later went back to teach at the school for 39 years - with many of his former students becoming leading designers in their own right, including Robert Haussmann, Kurt Thut and Bruno Rey.

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Woo Gilchrist
Issue 44 - What's in this issue?

I don’t know about you, but if feels like it’s been a hell of a slow start to 2019. Perhaps we weren’t feeling that optimistic about the coming year, in particular the next few months, and all the uncertainty that comes with living in the UK at the moment.

I know we’re concerned about how decisions will impact on our businesses as publishers and dealers, as the European marketplace has been very important to us over the years. We have established some great connections, and as you know, we do love to travel! There are a number of shows we’ll be attending over the next few months, from Brussels to Amsterdam, and hope it will all continue to be as effortless (and as much fun) as it’s been in previous years.

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Woo Gilchrist
Prisoner of Love

You’ll probably recognise these pieces – or at least one of them – but you may well know very little about the Swedish designer who created them all. Their classic look, and the fact that they are still so plentiful on the market, is proof of their high quality in design, comfort and function. The fabulous chairs and sofas of Arne Norell (1917-1971) are like the finest cashmere of the furniture world, made to live with for generations.

Norell began designing chairs in Sweden in the late 1940s – ‘The Thumb’ chair was designed for Gösta Westerberg – and started his own workshop in Stockholm in 1954 before moving to Småland in southern Sweden in 1958 to develop the company Möbel AB Arne Norell.

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Woo Gilchrist
Colour Wizard

I first discovered Bernat Klein back in 2014, having been given some wonderful bolts of vintage textiles, mohair and tweeds still on their original card. Sadly, it was also the very same year that he had died.

I quickly realised that his eye for colour extended far beyond his textiles – and the way he could deconstruct colours from an image and conjure them up again in glorious art and design is captivating.

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Woo Gilchrist