20th Century Design

A chair designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for perhaps his best-known patron, the Dutch Kitchen at Miss Cranston’s Argyle Street tearooms in Glasgow, is estimated to sell between £5,000-7,000.

Mackintosh carried out two phases of work at the 'Crown Lunch and Tea Rooms' in Argyle Street - first in 1898 and again in 1905/1906 when he returned to remodel and decorate the basement. Two photographs published in the Studio in October 1906 show a low beamed ceiling, a huge lintelled fireplace lined with blue and white Delft tiles and tables surrounded by simple and robust ‘Windsor’ style chairs. To contrast with a predominantly black and white palette, they were painted in emerald green.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Freaky Friday - The Darkside of Victorian Britain

We need to see the progress of the Victorian era as the triumph of science and reason. But there was another, less rational, Victorian age running parallel with this: an age that believed in ghosts and fairies, séances and the paranormal alongside such spooky popular ‘sciences’ as phrenology, galvanism and mesmerism.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Falling for Fornasetti

Fornasetti was a man of many talents: Milanese painter, sculptor, interior decorator, engraver of books and a creator of more than 11,000 products. In terms of variety of decoration, Fornasetti’s production of objects and furniture is one of the largest of the 20th century.

He’s celebrated as being among the most original creative talents of his time, and during his career he created a visual vocabulary that is instantly recognisable and unceasingly engaging.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Freaky Friday - The Eerie World of Vent Dolls

We were just reminiscing about some of the weirder things we’ve had the pleasure to have come across in our time. Like the time we went to photograph a collection of antique and vintage vent dolls. I remember vividly being left alone, in a bedroom, surrounded by them… fascinating - but very creepy indeed. We present for your reading pleasure - Vent Dolls.
Karyn (Ed).

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Think Tank

On 15th September 1916, in a muddy-cratered field in northern France, 36 metal war machines, which we now know as tanks, were deployed for the big push during the Battle of the Somme. These machines of death and destruction were the unlikely inspiration for Louis Cartier and his designs for the Tank watch, which he began in 1917 and unveiled to the world two years later in 1919.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Spellbound in Spitalfields

Walking east from Spitalfields down the Mile End Road, I arrived at the gateway surmounted by two stone eagles and reached through the iron gate to pull on a tenuous bell cord, before casting my eyes up at Malplaquet House.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Return of Peaky Blinders

Here at VE, we love a bit of Peaky Blinders, and are all looking forward to the new series which starts this weekend. In our December/January 2015 issue, VE Collective member Paul Stewart was fortunate enough to chat to the costume designer Lorna Marie Mugan, and we thought you’d like to read the article in preparation for Sunday night…

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Meet the VE Collective

VE is a magazine for both men and women, a bi-monthly in print guide to Vintage, Antiques, Decorative, Salvage, Mid-Century and Mantiques. Launched in 2011 to compliment its sister publication Antiquexplorer (Est 2000), which has since merged with VE to become a well loved, and well-rounded publication.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Top Rumps!

Here at the VE offices we love trumping. (No, not that kind of trumping!) Top Trumps had schoolkids in thrall from the 70s onwards, with corridors and playgrounds alive with kids’ attempts to nab one another’s cards by trumping their opponent’s score in one of a number of categories printed on the cards.

In a nostalgic discussion about vintage Top Trump cards recently, we realised that we also love stylish chairs, and that we also love spotting iconic and classic furniture in movies. So, putting all our passions together, here it is: chairs, movies, vintage cards... trump away!

Read More
Plan G

Antique collectors are always on the lookout for exclusive and rare. Vintage collectors, by contrast, can afford to embrace the democratic and ubiquitous. Mid-century aficionados are particularly lucky because, when the age of mass production met the post-war passion for design, it created a flood of timeless pieces that can still be collected for a song. (All right, sometimes these days it’s an aria, but still within the range of some of us.)

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
The Vitra Design Museum

If you are visiting Germany (a favourite location with us here at VE!) - then if you can, take the time to visit the Vitra Design Museum.

At the Vitra Schaudepot, designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the Vitra Design Museum presents key objects from its extensive collection, creating one the largest permanent exhibitions and research sites on contemporary furniture design.

Read More
Back to Black

The original gramophone records were made of dust and beetle poo. It’s true: shellac is a secretion of the Indian lac bug, which was mixed with pulverised stone to make the first platters. They played well but broke easily and, in the mid-1920s, the unfortunately named Waldo Semon patented a potential substitute – plasticised polyvinyl chloride. It wasn’t until the mid 1940s that the almost unbreakable vinyl (or, as I often see it misspelled, 'vynil') was extensively used to make music discs.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Friday Five Years Ago! - Pinball Wizard

A couple of years ago I bought an old Gottlieb mechanical pinball table dating from the mid-1950s with a view to restoring it to working condition. Having spent a few months searching for the necessary parts - including the unobtainable decorative back glass - I quickly came to the decision that sadly it was beyond economical repair. So, what do I do with it?

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Misshapes: The Making of Tatty Devine by Jo Aslett – VE’s Roving Reporter

Being a fan of Tatty Devine jewellery, I obviously jumped at the chance to go to an exhibition which showcases some of their best-loved pieces over the last 20 years.

Misshapes: The Making of Tatty Devine, is organised by the Crafts Council and celebrates the rise and success of design duo Harriet Vine and Rosie Wolfenden, who founded Tatty Devine in 1999 after they graduated from Chelsea College of Art.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
What a Carry On!

Who hasn’t heard of the classic British comedy Carry On series? When discussions of the NHS lead to calls of “Bring Back Matron”, who doesn’t have formidable but kindly Hattie Jaques in mind? Apparently, even Andy Warhol collaborator Paul Morrissey was a big fan of the whole Carry On genre!

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Eccentric Art

Curtis Jeré artisan house and its awesome sculptural works have become synonymous with Mid-century design and contemporary modernist settings. Though the name Curtis Jeré is familiar to many as the maker of eccentric modern design from the 1960s and 70s, relatively few are aware that it is a pseudonym for the design team of Curtis Freiler and Jerry Fels – who were brothers-in-law.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Light Fantastic

We’re in the throws of pulling our February/March 2019 issue together, and thought it would be fun to remind you of some of the great articles we brought you this time last year. This article about Hans Agne Jakobsson appeared in our Feb/Mar 2018 issue (now sold out).

Read More
Woo Gilchrist
Symbol Treasures

With the festive season fast approaching, many of us are readying ourselves to tackle the challenge of giving the perfect gift. In an age where sustainability and counting your blessings is important, we’ll most likely be on the hunt for something built to last and that will inevitably be cherished. A symbolic piece of antique or vintage jewellery could be the perfect solution to this present buying dilemma.

Read More
Woo Gilchrist